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Noel Stewart Millinery

Noel Stewart is a London based milliner with international status. Taking inspiration from contemporary art and architecture whilst using his extensive skills, he modernises millinery and creates a fresh and elegant approach to how we dress the head. Noels collections for men and women combine luxury materials and traditional craftsmanship with contemporary innovation.

Before attending the Royal College of Art, Noel worked with designers Dai Rees and Stephen Jones. This included time spent as Stephen Jones’s assistant at Christian Dior Couture, John Galliano and Louis Vuitton

Since establishing his label Noel has designed hats for leading fashion designers such as Roland Mouret, Diesel, Roksanda Ilincic, Erdem, Hussein Chalayan, Richard Nicoll, Jaeger, Marc by Marc Jacobs, Holly Fulton, Sibling, Viktor & Rolf, Claire Barrow and Gareth Pugh. His continuing work with such designers reflects the relevance of his role in contemporary fashion. [..]

In October 2013 Noel was appointed to the role of Creative Director of Christy and Co hats. Having been bought by Liberty, this heritage hat brand chose Noel for his in depth understanding of the industry and his unique ability to create contemporary headwear.

Click Here to Shop Noel Stewart

 
Melbourne Laser Cutters

One of the most popular question I get asked is all about laser cutting.

The most important thing is to make sure that your piece are individual and also the design is copyright.

Melbourne Laser Cutters, Click Here.

  • Melbourne laser cutter is a laser cutting service for creative individuals. We are a professional service for designers, small businesses and 
    individuals who want to add a cutting edge to their designs. 

    We are able to cut and emboss the following materials (non metals only):
    - Fabric, leather, acrylic, glass, wood, MDF, plywood to name a few. 

    Please email your artwork, quantity and the materials you are using for a quote.
  • Phone
    03 9939 4796
  • Email
    This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 
Gina Foster Millinery

When talking about Millinery in Australia we are so blessed to have so many talented, unique talents, but when you step of the plane and head for Royal Ascot and sit among the British Aristocracy, I am sorry, but I will let you know you are being judged from Head to Toe. It is ruthless and stiff upper lip and you will not hear a whisper, but trust me if a hair is out of place it will be noticed and you will be put into the group that shall not bear the right to enter the 'Royal Enclosure'. With Royal Ascot coming closer I am delighted to give you a peak into the world of Gina Foster Millinery. The elegance and grace not only of her master craftsmanship but the overseeing of the quality of her fabrics are second to none. The fabric and the way the sisal and sinemay has been blocked, you can see the attention to detail where the sisal line meets the edge of the block where I have been mentored by a Master Milliner to look for when assessing detail. When mentioning the name of Gina Foster Millinery, this is not a new name, as has featured on the Front of 'The Hat' magazine and also adorned by Duchess Catherine of Cambridge, need you look further. This work is sublime and perfection personified.

Click Here to be directed to Gina Foster Millinery

 
Celebrate National Hat Day With These 17 Stylish Toppers by A Choi

How’s that lovely head of yours doing? Is it bare and cold? Maybe it looks sad and boring because there isn’t a decorative accessory gracing it. But have no fear, because it’s National Hat Day and we’re brimming with ideas for great toppers. So, toss that hole-stricken beanie, and venture into the land of classic pageboys, cozy fur-lined trappers, and structured bowlers that will chicly adorn your crown. Here, see seventeen stylish millinery pieces that are anything but “old hat.”

Thank you to Vogue.com

 
It Belongs in a Museum: The Bristowe Hat by P Pultnam

The Bristowe Hat; silk tufting with ostrich feather and silver braid button; HRP Inventory Number 3503710

As a curator, one of my main responsibilities is to acquire new objects for the collection. We do this in a number of ways, but usually by attending auctions or encouraging donations.  The idea is that we preserve special objects for future generations and find new ways to tell the stories of our palaces and the people who lived and worked in them. Acquiring any new object for posterity is a good feeling, and sometimes, just sometimes, something really special comes along.

The Bristowe Hat is a very rare example of Tudor or very early Stuart fashion. It first appeared on my desk in the form of an email.  (‘Did we want it?’)  I was certainly very intrigued so I arranged to view it in person.  (‘Yes, we wanted it!’)  I set about researching it and consulting other scholars.  And so, in the middle of doing my last minute Christmas shopping I was also making sure that we got the hat.  The deal was sealed on Christmas Eve.

One of the reasons it’s so special is that so little dress survives from that period.  In the sixteenth century, materials were expensive and clothing was highly prized.  It was often handed down and repurposed or worn until it fell apart.  This hat is in remarkable condition for its age, and is clearly a very high status hat – it’s made from silk tufting, with a green feather, silver button, and evenly positioned holes for attaching jewels.

The other reason we really wanted this hat was its provenance.  The hat has always been in the possesion of Bristowe family, who trace their genealogy to important Tudor courtiers. Nicholas Bristowe (1495-1584) was the most prominent member of the family.  From the late 1530s, he was Clerk of the Wardrobe and Beds. From 1544 he was Clerk of the Jewels to Henry VIII, Edward VI, and Queens Mary and Elizabeth. His brother, Robert Bristowe, was Purse Bearer to Elizabeth I in the later years of her reign.

 

Family tradition has it that this was Henry VIII’s hat. Apparently,Nicholas Bristowe caught it when King Henry threw it in the air at the surrender of Boulogne in 1544. This is a good story but it cannot be verified.  However, it hasensured that the family have treasured it and kept in the best possible condition. It’s also an interesting link to the Tudor court opening up new stories about the lives of sixteenth century courtiers. So far, we have been able to uncover that Nicholas received gifts of clothing from the king on more than one occasion and\ also inherited the clothing of prisoners attained for treason at the Tower.  For example, Nicholas received some of Thomas Cromwell’s clothes as a gift from the king at Hampton Court, the day before Cromwell was executed.  Distributing the goods of prisoners was the king’s prerogative and a common practice – it was a way of demonstrating his power and authority.

We may never know exactly who wore it or how it came into the hands of the Bristowes.  We do know that it’s important and very rare, and that it has already opened up new questions and stories for us.  Personally, I like to think the hat has been here at Hampton Court before and that it’s now come home…

Eleri Lynn, Collections Curator

Thank you to Historic Royal Palaces, for this story. Click Here.

 
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